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Expert Insights

Analysis of trends in senior care, advice for people coping with an aging patent, and health advice for seniors.

Determining if independent or assisted living is right for you

Assisted LivingKnowing when the time is right to consider independent or assisted living is a personal moment in a senior’s life, but for many, transitioning from a private home to an independent or assisted living community is a smart decision that has a positive impact on the senior’s emotional wellbeing and physical wellbeing.

Knowing when it’s the right time for independent living
Independent living is for seniors who want the benefits of living in a senior living community but who are still mobile, can live their day-to-day lives without supervision and are able to monitor their own medication.

It can be ideal for younger seniors who enjoy being active but tire of the responsibilities that come with owning a home and who long for more active social lives. There are many benefits to moving into an independent living community, including:

Tips to aging well and living a more satisfying life

A resident from the Greek island of Ikaria—a seemingly magical place in the north Aegean Sea where cancer and disease are rare and people live to ripe, old ages—is offering tips on living longer in her new cookbook, “Ikaria: Lessons on Food, Life, and Longevity from the Greek Island Where People Forget to Die.”

The 99-square mile island has been the subject of much research and was even featured in a New York Times profile in 2012, featuring the story of an Ikarian man who left the island, only to return years later after a cancer diagnosis. He had been given less than a year to live, but found that his health returned once he moved back to his native island.

Tips for family caregivers

Tips for caregiversIncreasingly, family members are providing care for aging parents or relatives. Many find themselves stretched thin as they try to juggle caregiving responsibilities with their regular job. Surveys suggest that in the last five years, roughly 42 percent of working Americans cared for an aging adult at some point; meanwhile, 17 percent currently provide care. Those numbers are likely to continue growing as our senior population continues growing. 

Reduce chronic inflammation through volunteering

Not only does volunteering allow you to give back, recent research has also linked it to reduced levels of inflammation. Researchers believe, among other things, that such productive activities can benefit older adults’ health because they provide meaningful social roles, which positively impact the volunteer’s well-being.

The study, published in The Gerontologist, looked at four different productive activities—employment, volunteering, attending meetings and caregiving—and how they might play a role in reducing chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation has been linked to the risk of heart attack and stroke, emphasizing the importance of keeping inflammation levels low.

This fall, protect yourself from the flu

flu tipsIt’s no wonder so many people love autumn – it brings beautiful fall foliage, delicious seasonal treats like hot apple cider and caramel apples, and plenty of fun festive activities, from apple picking to pumpkin carving to trick-or-treating with the kids. And yet, autumn also means that cold and flu season is approaching. At EPOCH, we want our residents and staff – as well as each and every one of you! – to enjoy all your favorite fall festivities, so we encourage everyone to be proactive about protecting their health.

 
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